Private bill to introduce further charges to patients for healthcare services is due for second reading today

NHS charges

Christopher Chope, a Barrister and the Conservative MP for Christchurch, has proposed a private bill that would make provision for co-funding, and to extend the use of ‘co-payment’ – charges – throughout the National Health Service (NHS); and for “connected purposes.”

Though there are already some charges for health services such dental treatments, eye tests and prescriptions already, experts have warned that if the bill gains assent, it would open the floodgates to charging for a range of other services including GPs appointments and minor operations.

The National Health Service (Co-Funding and CoPayment) Bill would “make provision for co-funding and for the extension of co-payment for NHS services in England” and this will be the second reading of the bill.

MPs are set to debate the proposed bill today.

Recent changes to NHS prescribing guidelines has shown that the co-payment system is far from perfect. Controversial limits to the kind of conditions for which GPs can prescribe medication. Instead, patients will be given advice on what medications to buy from the pharmacy. 

Simon Stevens, Chief Executive of NHS England, said: “Across the NHS our aim is to: ‘Think like a patient, act like a taxpayer’. The NHS is probably the most efficient health service in the world, but we’re determined to keep pushing further. Every pound we save from cutting waste is another pound we can then invest in better A&E care, new cancer treatments and much better mental health services.” 

John O’Connell, Chief Executive of the TaxPayers’ Alliance approved the changes, adding that “It’s great news that NHS England will save a vast amount of taxpayers’ money by curbing prescriptions for basic items that are much cheaper to buy in the supermarket than they are to prescribe. Taxpayers should not be footing the bill for items like anti dandruff shampoo or athlete’s foot powder, so cutting out wasteful spending like this will mean that precious resources can be focused on frontline services. Patients too must remember that these items are not “free” – the money comes out of taxpayers’ pockets, so NHS England should be applauded for this move.”

However, someone should remind Stevens and O’Connell that everyone pays tax and national insurance. This kind of rationing is a steep and slippery slope to a health service that is no longer free at the point of delivery. 

However, NHS has always been free at the point of delivery – that’s one of the founding principles on which it was created. Millions of ordinary people rely on this principle. Under no circumstances must we permit the government to take us back to the time when had to sell their household belongings to see their doctor. Citizens in a civilised  and democratic society should not be penalised financially for being ill and needing NHS services.

Justin Madders MP, Labour’s Shadow Health Minister, said: “Once again we see the Tories’ true colours.

“At a time when the NHS is going through the biggest funding squeeze in its history and more than four million people are waiting for treatment, Tory MPs are proposing a two-tier system where those who can afford it get treated first.

“Labour’s first priority will be to give the NHS the funding it needs to protect an NHS free at the point of use for everyone who needs it.”

Chope has previously tabled a range of other controversial bills.

He was appointed as the Parliamentary Private Secretary to Peter Brooke, the Minister of State at the Treasury in 1986, before being promoted by Margaret Thatcher to serve in her government as the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State at the Department for the Environment later in the same year, where he was responsible for steering through the immensely unpopular “Community Charge” (best known as the Poll tax) legislation.

In June 2013 Chope was one of four MPs who camped outside Parliament in a move to facilitate parliamentary debate on what they called an “Alternative Queen’s Speech” – an attempt to show what a future Conservative government might deliver. 42 policies were listed including reintroduction of the death penalty and conscription, privatising the BBC, banning the burka in public places and preparation to leave the European Union. 

Chope helped to lead backbench support for the motion calling for a European Referendum. He has also been heavily involved in the use of private member’s bills to achieve this aim. Chope came under fire in January 2013 for referring to some staff in the House of Commons as “servants”. Parallels were drawn between this opinion and his views on the minimum wage – which he has called to be abolished.

On 28 November 2014 Chope, a private landlord, filibustered a Liberal Democrat bill with cross party support intended to make revenge evictions an offence.

In 2014 Chope along with six other Conservative Party MPs voted against the Equal Pay (Transparency) Bill which would require all companies with more than 250 employees to declare the gap in pay between the average male and average female salaries.

He came under criticism in late 2014 for repeatedly blocking a bill that would ban the use of wild animals in circus performances, justifying his actions by saying “The EU Membership Costs and Benefits bill should have been called by the clerk before the circuses bill, so I raised a point of order”.

You can read Chope’s latest controversial and draconian bill: The National Health Service (Co-Funding and Co-Payment) Bill here.

GP and NHS campaigner, Bob Gill, says:

Ever wondered why Government wanted to spend a fortune on the charging infrastructure for collecting relatively insignificant sums from illegal immigrants using the NHS?

Well that was the cover story. Reality is that charging was always intended to apply to everyone.

Here is the Bill to extend charging to all.”

Please tell your MPs to attend the debate and to argue and vote against it, whatever party they are.

Here is how to contact your MP.

Template emails are downloadable from the 999 Call for the NHS website.

Let’s not let the Conservatives get away with privatising our NHS by stealth.

Image result for MPs with a vested interest in NHS

 

Update

The bill did not get through the second reading, as it ran out of time. However,  the Conservatives have rescheduled the bill for another attempt, on Friday 15 June.

Related 

Rogue company Unum’s profiteering hand in the government’s work, health and disability green paper: work as a “health outcome”.

 


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9 thoughts on “Private bill to introduce further charges to patients for healthcare services is due for second reading today

  1. “Mr Chope also used his additional costs allowance (ACA) to fund the £10,377 repair of the roof of the 200-year-old London house that he jointly owns with his wife. He kitted out the property with a bathroom costing more than £2,600 to buy and install – again on the taxpayer.”
    the telegraph.
    never mind though, he’s jsut the rump end of the tory party and will soon, along with the rest of them, be dead. the NHS however, will survive and then thrive. Hope not Chope.

    Liked by 3 people

  2. Reblogged this on Guy Debord's Cat and commented:
    Kitty S Jones on Christopher Chope’s Private Member’s Bill to introduce charges for healthcare. Whenever a bill is introduced to hammer the less well-off (in other words, those people who aren’t members of his social class), you’ll always find Chope and the usual suspects not too far behind.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Chope does sound like a charmer… not.
    It seems the second reading of this bill is now scheduled for Friday 15th June. Lots of time to use the template letters and email our MPs…
    7 National Health Service (Co-Funding and Co-Payment) Bill: Second Reading
    Order read, That the National Health Service (Co-Funding and Co-Payment) Bill be now read a second time.

    Objection taken (Standing Order No. 11(2)).

    Bill to be read a second time on Friday 15 June.

    https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201719/cmvote/180511v01.html

    Liked by 1 person

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